the jungle

Over 2 years since the demolition of the ‘Jungle’ camp in Calais there are still over 3000 refugees dispersed and living around Northern France and Belgium. Deteriorating conditions have lead refugees to try increasingly risky methods of reaching the UK.
A few months ago I wrote about the work of Refugee Community Kitchen, a charity in Calais responsible for providing food to the hundreds of refugees in and around the city and Dunkirk. Since 2015 RCK has prepared, cooked, and delivered almost 600,000 meals. They serve hot, nourishing food daily, and like most of the refugee charities in Calais, they rely entirely on donations and volunteers.
We all believe it is a moral duty to help those in need. Indeed, when I was last in Calais, this was put succinctly by a fellow volunteer who said (paraphrasing): "Being in the position to help, is exactly the same thing as being obligated to".
Due to the outcry against the new British animal fat £5 note, some shops have been refusing the note as tender. Reports show that customers even deny it for change. Perfect Solution: Reprint the new British £5 note with pumpkin seed oil.
Every day that they hear nothing draws them closer to despair. Without hope of reaching the UK by legal routes, more vulnerable children like Dawit will decide to take their fate into their own hands, leaving them homeless in Europe during the freezing Winter months.
There's spectacle in every modern crisis. Take refugees: we watch, engulfed in the torrent of media, agog; we see crisis
Connections, the language, and hostilities.
Seven-year-olds aren't equipped to cross a continent and then fend for themselves in a makeshift tent. They die, they disappear and all the time smug fasicsts are sitting in their provincial homes posting on Facebook about an immigrant's hoodie looking too clean.
Around 200 activists have gathered at the camps in recent days.
As the demolition of ‘The Jungle’ migrant camp in Calais began on Monday, the plight of the some 6,500 refugees living there