Women in STEM

As Apollo 11 launched from on 16 July 1969, a sea of men watched on from inside NASA's firing room in Florida. Among them was one woman. JoAnn Morgan made her prime-time debut as the first female launch controller during Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins’ historic mission to the moon. But getting there wasn’t easy.
Astronaut Anne McClain is being replaced by male colleague Nick Hague, NASA said.
This International Day for Women And Girls In Science, there is a lot to celebrate. The Department of Education released a report showing how efforts to encourage more girls into STEM subjects in school has led to a 25 percent in girls taking STEM subjects. At a higher level of education, women accounted for 54 percent of UK STEM postgraduates.
"Why do we think a girl has to choose science or lipstick?" 🚀💄
Overlooking the female perspective in innovation can actually cost lives. Until we see diverse female perspectives as necessary, we won’t achieve true equality
Positive representation must be more prevalent
Could necessity become the driver for diversity and the solution to our crisis? Consider Bletchley Park, the Government’s
Could necessity become the driver for diversity and the solution to our crisis? Consider Bletchley Park, the Government’s
For the women themselves, it's a long-suffered truth. Statistically, women remain underrepresented in most areas of science at every level, from undergraduate courses all the way through to professorships. Despite how far we've come, there's a lot further to go, as these stories from women we met exhibiting at London's New Scientist Live exposition in September highlight.
Opposing the sciences to the humanities, particularly the arts, has been a persistent trend over recent decades, with countless debates and essays focused on demonstrating that one is more important than the other. Sometimes contextualised as the left side of the brain versus the right side - or logical thinking versus artistic creativity - the two are often described as polar opposites