calais

My memories of the Jungle are now eight months old and have been somewhat clouded by the harrowing stories of our clients as well as the hundreds of hours put into representing them since our visits. Last week, however, these memories came flashing back.
We all believe it is a moral duty to help those in need. Indeed, when I was last in Calais, this was put succinctly by a fellow volunteer who said (paraphrasing): "Being in the position to help, is exactly the same thing as being obligated to".
The only home had by some 1,500 men women and children has been reduced to ashes. This is a dire and deeply tragic situation, that was entirely preventable. It is important to remember, these are not criminals to be interned, but individuals experiencing the deepest tragedy of their lives, fleeing war, persecution and violence. They don't need our pity, but they deserve dignity and respect, because without this, their suffering will only be intensified.
Child refugees have been emphatically failed by the British government. Wanting to help children is a worthy impulse. But in the end we have to engage with, both the children and, their families. Waves of migrants are moving across Western Europe driven by war and famine. So far European governments have tried to deal with the problem with barbed wire, walls, bulldozing encampments and criminalising the migrants themselves. There has to be a better and more sustainable response. We need much more genuine co-operation between European governments, whether they are in Schengen or not. Sadly, with Britain leaving the EU, better co-operation seems further away than ever.
In 2016 I experienced a lot of change and found myself fumbling from one job to another; signing the dotted line on yet another zero hour contract. I wanted remain but lost and my mind became hazy. I felt detached until it suddenly occurred to me that what I really wanted to do was something fulfilling, constructive and meaningful.
I feel the resolution to this refugee crisis, and all global crises is with kindness. There ultimately needs to be infrastructure to provide for the care of the refugees. Whether this is with the full support of major NGOs or the UN, or simply local communities welcoming refugees in with arms open.
Child refugees who have been turned away from the UK could have their cases reviewed, as the Home Office comes under pressure
Over the summer I spent some time working with refugees in northern Greece. Most of my hours in the camp were spent listening to people, whether about their story of crossed continents, the loved ones they were trying find or simply the daily problems they faced.
Just 350 children were accepted into the UK out of the 3,000 expected.