Infant formula

Case studies show that using small amounts of DHM instead of formula reduces hospital stay and supports breastfeeding, by feeling like a bridge for mums to establishing their own supply.
We have a long history of not being very supportive of breastfeeding and breastfeeding mothers at all. But like many challenges, the start of it – the earliest weeks – often feel the toughest.
This started way before President Trump and will likely continue long after him.
It was playing on my mind for months, I was enraged at the cold, dehumanising term so I wanted to check I wasn't misinterpreting the word or overreacting. Out came my trusty Oxford Dictionary which provided me with the following definition:
After reading an absolutely thoughtless post on social media from a mother who regularly uploads picture-perfect images of her life, I felt the need to write. To offload the frustration and borderline anger that was sparked in me when reading her ill-informed and blinkered take on infant feeding.
I know that you want the best for your precious baby. You've spent nine gruelling months providing a safe and comfortable home for the life you and your partner created together. The physical changes, aches and pains and the emotional rollercoaster ride is a challenge for even the most straightforward of pregnancies.
We are by no means anti-breastfeeding or being discriminatory by not featuring breastfeeding pictures in our campaign; we are just acutely aware of how these can affect some people who seek out our network. Our movement and support is for bottle-feeders, there is nothing for breastfeeders to feel offended about.
Being a woman of reproductive age, who shares pictures of my kids and parenting stuff on social media, the algorithms-that-be at Facebook make sure I have lots of 'relevant' advertising pop up in my feed.
The science underpinning the importance of breast feeding has been well documented and cannot be overstated. In 2003 the Lancet published a series on child survival emphasising that exclusive breast feeding, if universalised, could save 13% of all under five deaths, (an estimated 1.3million in the 42 high mortality countries).