loss

Going through loss or bereavement teaches you a thing or two about attachment. Love, connection, compassion and empathy are human conditions. They're innate, genetic and what makes us truly unique amongst the animal kingdom.
A teenager has reminded us all to appreciate our parents more by sharing a letter her mum wrote her before she died. Hannah
I've always believed that you don't get over grief, you get along with it. You rub along with it as best you can. Two years on and I still hold this belief. I'm not over grief, I haven't come through it, but I'm learning to live life alongside it.
The passing of time is something none of us can control. It's become my enemy over the last few years. Starting with us trying for children and then moving to heartbreak when we lost my cousin to cancer in 2016. Time moving forward caused pain, it's frustrating and there is absolutely nothing we can do about it.
Losing my wife and soul mate Katie is the most difficult thing I have ever had to face. It is a reality I had never imagined and should never have needed to comprehend, but in many ways, I was fortunate. I don't enjoy writing that, but there is a truth to it.
I've lost count of the number of times people have told me how strong I am. Considering I rarely set foot in a gym and my body bears the sagging signs of having carried three children, I'd be surprised if they meant physically so. Rather, they're talking about the resilience I've shown since losing my mum to cancer last summer.
It's 7am at a London airport security desk. I'm peering at a bomb scanner monitor that shows a remarkably accurate X-ray
Fondest memories, recipes and wishes are all left behind.
The physical pain I was in was nothing compared to the emotional pain that hit me like a train. I cried and cried and felt like a failure. I apologised to Paul who was with me the whole way through this traumatic experience. Of course he told me I had nothing at all to apologise for, which I now know is true. The doctors were really helpful and empathetic.