maajid nawaz

'It's incredibly dangerous not to address a subject because we fear it’s going to increase tension.'
 The media has a duty to seek out alternative voices to showcase ways of living as a Muslim in Europe, Quilliam Foundation
"This is not a religious conversation. This has to be a human rights conversation."
Schools should be holding open conversations about extremism with their pupils, alongside teaching the history of jihadism
Last week in the United States, the spectre of identity politics reared its ugly head once more, as a white student at San
Last week, Charlie Hebdo magazine contained cartoons featuring Aylan Kurdi's death. The cartoons mocked the atmosphere which
The treatment of Maajid Nawaz by the Guardian (in contrast to its recently-published interview with the leader of Hizb-ut-Tahrir in Britain) reveals a worrying trend in the British Left today, namely its fascination with the search for a Community Representative and the compartmentalising of identity.
The articles of a thousand words, detailing what is wrong with Charlie Hebdo continue. A quick line or two condemn the murder of the cartoonists. Then the rest of the piece that in life they were out of order to satirise and lampoon religion and the religious.
If we are really concerned about the likes of Anjem Choudary poisoning minds to take up violence to overthrow democracy, banning him from our television screens is the wrong way... We make much of the liberty to think and voice our opinions. The line that most free speech advocates draw is an incitement to kill. For which laws currently exist, along with counter terrorism legislation. The home secretary risks making Choudary a victim for Islamists to rally for with the new proposals. Young people, with radical religious notions of changing the world, will have an officially state stamped underground movement. How nice of us to signal that for them.