putin

The UK has been leading the charge against Russia, accusing it of a number of global attacks. The Netherlands and the US followed hours later.
Western strikes have damaged the chances of achieving a political resolution in the seven-year Syria conflict, Putin and Iranian counterpart agree, accoring to the Kremlin.
Moralising about Putin is no longer an adequate response. The question, as Lenin once asked is: What is to be done? Perhaps after his inevitable re-election someone will provide an answer.
Russia's 2018 presidential elections are now less than six months away. The Kremlin is almost conspicuously silent about
The surprise announcement to hand the probe over to Mueller, a lawman with deep bipartisan respect, was a striking shift
I have not lived in Russia for almost 10 years, but until recently I would frequently visit the country. However, increasingly I find that I am simply not welcome. Russia - like the rest of the world - is consumed by increasing levels of ethno-religious intolerance and hate.
People in Russia are at the mercy of the state-controlled media. People in the West needn't be. If this is the new Cold War, then the West would do well to remember what had helped it to bring down the Berlin Wall and diffuse tensions at the end of the last century.
Sometimes I think that, as individuals and as a species, it is not until we are pushed to the brink, that we find the strength to evolve beyond our limited viewpoints and ego. The alternative is almost too unbearable to contemplate - the potential annihilation of human civilization and the destruction of life on an unprecedented scale.
Heads of states come and go and, as recent events in Europe show, in a rapidly changing world, that seems to be the only opportunity for compromise and peaceful transition toward the new global realities. Yet if Erdogan would still manage to eat his cake and have it too, perhaps to everybody's surprise, he will be able to surpass Ataturk's legacy too.