Skills

When it comes to education, Britain is falling behind. While others look to the future, we seem stuck in the past. The ways
When it comes to education, Britain is falling behind. While others look to the future, we seem stuck in the past. The ways
Could necessity become the driver for diversity and the solution to our crisis? Consider Bletchley Park, the Government’s
Could necessity become the driver for diversity and the solution to our crisis? Consider Bletchley Park, the Government’s
The failure and self-interest of elites has become the conventional wisdom. After Brexit, and the election of Donald Trump, politicians are desperate to connect with the 'just about managing' and those who feel the last twenty years have left them behind.
It was a long summer of discontent for universities, who took a pummelling from Fleet Street and various lords a leaping. But now they are back to the serious job of educating people for a rapidly-changing world. Most commentators are clear about the trajectory and drivers of these changes, but not the speed.
There was one sentence which really leapt out of me from the Prime Minister's speech to conference last week. She pledged
It's September and my social media is jam packed with photos of children heading back to school. For some, it is the very first time they will enter our education system. But what many of them don't know is that the jobs they will eventually find and settle into later down the line are not the jobs that exist today. 65% of children entering primary school this month will work in jobs in the future we don't even know about yet.
It took me a year of soul searching to realise for the last fifteen years I'd done what I thought I was supposed to, what society wanted of me, my family, friends. The last time I'd revelled in what I'd done was at uni - reading novels and analysing them, and before that it was time as a little girl writing fairy stories.