Conservative Party

It is true to say that the European Union is in one hell of a mess. The credit rating agencies have downgraded Ireland's debts to junk, the Greeks are defaulting, the Italians are in chaos and rumours are abound about the possibility of a massive constitutional change in order to defend its dreams.
The author of Winnie the Pooh, A.A. Milne, once said that 'organising is what you do before you do something, so that when you do it, it is not all mixed up'. This coalition government has demonstrated a boldly pragmatic and non-ideological mindset since taking office. Nevertheless, there is a danger that on planning, the Government is ideologically dismissing an integrated approach in favour of extending responsibility to communities. Localism is great for running a local park, but it cannot provide integrated national solutions to the big environmental challenges facing the UK.
Fresh from accusing Tom Baldwin of commissioning a private investigator to blag details of a bank account, Lord Ashcroft
Could it be that banks now rely on computer based risk models, so when the 'computer says no' its nothing personal. It's the computers fault, not the friendly bank manager giving your innovative business idea the thumbs down or cutting off access to cash during your liquidity issues.
"The British economy is indeed recovering...economic growth is now strong" and "it will become stronger" as a result of the work the Government is doing. This was the Business Secretary Vince Cable speaking in the House of Commons on 13 January.
Good morning and thank you for coming. Over the past few days, the whole country has been shocked by the revelations about
Sitting opposite Labour members has been an instructive experience over the last fourteen months. For them debt - and the accumulation of it - is an alien concept. To every cut they shout "shame"; to every saving they accuse us of attacking the vulnerable and dispossessed. But to the central question of the national finances, they offer little comment - other than a repetition of whatever Ed Balls is offering from his wonderland that day.
Given the Conservatives' blanket opposition to expansion at Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted, and their conscientiously-crafted
The Government is trying to save money in the public sector; that's fine - indeed, that's a big part of what I voted for. However, I'm not in favor of unfair, symbolic, ideological cuts. Why are cuts to teacher's pensions unfair, ideological & symbolic? Simple: The Teachers Pension Scheme is not making a loss.
The 2011 local election results were understandably greeted with enthusiasm by Conservatives. Pundits predicted losses of up to 500 council seats, but in the end the Conservatives gained 80. The national voter share of 35% was almost equivalent to Labour's 37%. Not bad for a party that has had to take some tough economic decisions.