Nice attack

As news of the terror which took place at Westminster Bridge broke out at the school gates on Wednesday, there were feelings
As a reformed extremist, I can identify better than most the Islamist platform from which these young men operate from. From my time in Al Muhajiroun, now a banned UK terrorist group, I remember well the exploitative nature of marrying religious ideology with geo-political events.
Today, Nice and Berlin are connected via hashtags, comparisons and, more importantly, the simple fact of shared grief. While it's impossible to tell whether there's a co-ordinated plot to 'attack our way of life' this is unlikely to be the last attack of its kind, no matter what walls are built or immigration laws passed.
The mayor of Cannes has banned full-body, head-covering swimsuits worn by some Muslim women from the resort’s beaches. The
Police across the United Kingdom have reacted with a mixture of sorrow, anger and a huge degree of foreboding to events in Dallas, Nice, Baton Rouge and Munich. As each of these tragedies unfolded and as word reaches them of further incidents such as those at Wurzburg, Ansbach and now Saint-Etienne-Du-Rouvray, they will be asking themselves: 'What if.'
It is the sort of breaking news you can neither comprehend nor believe. When I heard that Father Jacques Hamel, an 84 year old priest, was murdered by having his throat cut in St-Etienne-du-Rouvray, in Northern France, by two men claiming to be part of ISIS, I just could not believe it.
Civilians were mistaken for Islamist militants, rights group says.
Many people lambasted the alleged “mistake” made by the US-led coalition, with some reporting that civilian casualties from