smart living

For a number of years now, the Internet of Things has been making itself felt around the home. From toasters connected to Wi-Fi to heating systems controlled from your phone, more and more of our household appliances are going online.
The author of the TechRadar piece makes the point about the assistants needing to understand more complex things beyond just location. Don't get me wrong, location awareness is really important for lots of reasons but there are other more useful sensing capabilities.
Among these current users, there are some predictable demographic trends: 16-24s, men and the upper income groups lead for all of them except smart health devices (where women and 25-34s take the lead). So, to date, the main audience for smart home products has been relatively affluent young men, a group who are often prominent among tech early adopters.
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