milk

'British kids have been let down by the current childhood obesity strategy.'
Lactose intolerance is a gastrointestinal condition, recognised throughout the medical community as loss of function in the enzyme lactase that helps us digest lactose, the naturally occurring sugar in cows' milk.
Last week marked World Osteoporosis Day - a condition that affects over three million people in the UK. It is characterised by changes to the structure and density of bones, making them thin, weak and prone to breakages.
It's World School Milk Day today when schools from more than 40 countries across the world celebrate the health benefits
Usually you’d only expect milk to be fizzy when it’s gone off, but carbonated dairy products could soon be making their way
Worryingly, the trend is greatest in our young generation of 16-24 year olds who are shunning dairy at the fastest rate, despite needing it the most during their strong bone-forming years to prevent health issues such as osteoporosis or thinning bones later in life.
The old tricks are the best! Making shapes out of sandwiches, presenting fruit in small colourful containers, adding a fun curly straw to drink their milk with - it all helps to make sure they actually eat everything. After all, children don't get any nutritional benefit from food that never leaves the lunchbox.
We're all used to it by now; when the summer arrives, so do the fashionable diets that claim to completely transform our bodies in a few short weeks. They take over our news feeds, magazine racks and even the supermarket aisles. But is there some truth in the latest summer health trends?
Do you remember when the free-from section in the supermarket consisted of an odd-looking packet of biscuits that disintegrated in a cup of tea and a sad looking loaf of bread that tasted like cardboard? These products were produced for those with diagnosed allergies and intolerances and would be marked with 'approved' or 'certified' stamps to help consumers avoid making a potentially dangerous mistake when choosing a product.